Why the AMP Plugin

One of the major virtues of WordPress is the flexibility of the platform. You can accomplish basically anything you can imagine, as demonstrated by the large and ever expanding ecosystem of plugins available to add functionality and customize your website in a myriad of ways. However, this same virtue can also turn into one of the major challenges of the platform. Even taking into account plugins that are very good (i.e. follow coding/performance best practices and coexist nicely with other site components), the likelihood of having plugins colliding in their interactions (or impacting performance) when jointly activated in a site, is definitely not negligible.

This virtue/challenge duality of the WordPress ecosystem has its parallel in the open-web web publishing ecosystem. In the latter, there is nothing restricting a web developer to hamper the performance of a site by following counterproductive coding practices (e.g. loading scripts synchronously, render-blocking CSS). And even if the developer builds a site impeccably, adding a third-party JS library could spell a performance disaster.

The AMP project emerged as a response to that reality, bringing forward effective design principles and control mechanisms that enable sites to offer predictable performance. The effectiveness of AMP and its impact on UX is demonstrated by plenty of data and examples in the wild. And WordPress publishers would also benefit greatly from having more control of the UX of their sites. This could be achieved by adopting coding and performance best practices in WordPress development, and integrating AMP with the WordPress ecosystem to make the WordPress platform more performant.